Submission Number: MBTL-EIS-0000275 

Received: 9/17/2013 7:04:00 PM
Commenter: Ken Hardy
Organization: 
State: Washington

Agency: Cowlitz County, the Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Initiative: Millennium Bulk-Terminals Longview EIS
Attachments: No Attachments
Submission Text
From:kandslbirds@comcast.net Sent:Tuesday, September 17, 2013 7:04 PM To:comments@millenniumbulkeiswa.gov Subject:cmment in favor of the Millennium Bulk terminal

To whom it may concern, I would like to see the installation of the Millennium bulk terminal go forward, provided the infrastructure for mitigation of air quality and transportation are in place prior to operation of the facility, this would include the assurance of free traffic flow across the Lewis & Clark bridge, into the port area and into the current Weyerhaeuser plant site. The jobs that this facility will provide are sorely needed in the Cowlitz county area. I first moved to Washington state in 1950 and lived here the better part of my life, many years in the Twin Harbors area and since 1978, in Longview,---I was out of the state for several years while I was in the military but I've always felt this was my home state and I've been able to enjoy many pleasant years growing up here and subsequently raising my family here. While I do understand that there will be some impact on our local area from this facility, I also feel the addition of family wage jobs are sorely needed and the benefits will outweigh the environmental costs. If the attitude we're seeing from a very vocal group of environmentalists would have been prevalent when Mr. Long came to this area, there would be no Longview or the Long Bell, Fibre, Reynolds and Weyerhaeuser plants that have provided this community with well paying jobs for many years---I personally have been blessed with good employment in Longview, having worked at Reynolds metals for 2.5 years and Weyerhaeuser (Norpac division) for 32 years. While I do believe that climate change is taking place, I believe that it is a natural occurrence and there isn't a whole lot we as humans can do to change it---I base my beliefs partly over what I've seen during my lifetime (69 years) and also on what I learned on a recent Alaskan tour taken this last June----part of our tour took in the Glacier Bay area where at one time the glacier extended all the way to the sea but in the early 1700's it started retreating at the rate of 1 mile per year until now it is some 85 miles from the ocean----I have to wonder what the world population was at that time and how much of an impact that population had on the climate?? Thank you for the opportunity to comment, Ken Hardy, Longview